Home / Competition / Shooting IDPA with a Hi-Point

Shooting IDPA with a Hi-Point

Sometimes I make posts on the Triangle Tactical Facebook Page without thinking about what I’m saying:

So, I did it, and honestly, it wasn’t as terrible as I was expecting, but that’s not really saying much. I didn’t use a nylon holster though, I ended up taking an old kydex Glock 19 holster that I’d made and just warmed it up with a heat gun and stuffed the Hi-Point in it and it fit reasonably well.

I had planned to take the Hi-Point to the Shoot2Live IDPA match last weekend but I was short a magazine, and then the match was cancelled due to the icy weather we were having. I looked at the calendar, and saw that H2O Fowl Farms was having a Back Up Gun match this weekend and decided that would be a great place to try it out (and I wouldn’t have to buy another magazine for this thing).

The Back Up Gun matches at H2O are the perfect match for something like this. There are 5 stages that consist of 2 strings each. Each string is 5 rounds, and there aren’t any reloads on the clock. Holsters aren’t required as all of the stages are shot from low-ready or off a table or something.

Reliability

The thing I was most concerned about was that I would be shucking rounds out of the pistol all morning and clearing jams and stuff like that. As luck would have it, the only issues with reliability were when loading the pistol before a stage. 2 or 3 times it jammed up trying to get the first round from the magazine into the chamber, but I’ll blame that on my really short reloads.

Accuracy

I wasn’t expecting to have a lot of accuracy issues with the Hi-Point but it turns out that was the main issue with it. Specifically, keyholes. According to the IDPA rulebook, my keyholes do get to count for score since they were’t created by the bullet impacting any other object:

4.8.2 The elongated bullet hole rule does not include keyhole bullet holes (a keyhole bullet hole is created by a bullet which tumbles out of the firearm barrel and appears to have gone through the target sideways,) which count for score if they were made without interference from another object.

Most of the rounds I shot through the gun keyholed. A listener suggested on Instagram that it may have been my reloads, and that’s possible, but my friend that owns the gun told me to expect keyholes with it, and he shoots factory ammo.

wp-1454319156514.jpg

In the above picture, the keyholed bullet tore into the perforation of the non-threat target and got me a penalty.

wp-1454319042310.jpg

For this shot, my muzzle ended up being only maybe 16″ from the target, and the bullet still impacted it sideways. Interestingly, on all of the targets that were ~10 yards away, there were no keyholes, but the bullets all impacted low. Is it possible for a bullet to re-stabilize in air? I don’t know, but it seems odd to me that it was consistent with the keyholes up close, and regular grease rings further away.

Bottom Line

I was really hoping that I could go to the match and shred with a Hi-Point to prove that gear really doesn’t matter as much as we all think it does. That wasn’t really the case. I ended up with 57 points down (that’s almost 1 point down for every shot fired), which was a real kick in the pants on the score sheet. It ended up placing me in the middle of the pack which was honestly a blow to the ego seeing my name so low on the score sheet when I was hoping/expecting to finish somewhere in the top 5 or 10 shooters.

So, I’m concluding with this: If you’ve never shot a match before, and all you have is something like a Hi-Point pistol, you should still go shoot your first match if it’s something that’s interesting to you. The shortcomings of the pistol will be apparent, but it’s good enough to get a match under your belt with. Chances are, you’ll want to upgrade to something better relatively quickly though.

About Lucas

Editor/Head Honcho at Triangle Tactical. Lucas is a life long shooter and outdoorsman, avid concealed carrier and competitive shooter, and a lover of pork fat.

3 comments

  1. So, I’m concluding with this: If you’ve never shot a match before, and all you have is something like a Hi-Point pistol, you should still go shoot your first match if it’s something that’s interesting to you. The shortcomings of the pistol will be apparent, but it’s good enough to get a match under your belt with. Chances are, you’ll want to upgrade to something better relatively quickly though.

    Shouldn’t the summary be “If your High Point shoots as poorly as this one it’s largely useless for competition AND — more importantly — self defense, and you should damn well bury it in your backyard right now and buy a Glock 19 or M&P or something worthwhile.”

    • If it didn’t keyhole (and I suspect most Hi-Points don’t) I think it has a place in the market. I think of the single mom who wants to be able to protect herself but can’t afford to drop $550 on a Glock. The Hi-Point at $150 is relatively reliable, and definitely beats harsh words and a sharp stick.

  2. Slo-mo footage of the bullet tumbling (and maybe stabilizing) would be neat. Any chance of contacting that Tech Assassin guy for a co-op effort?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.